This Bipolar Life: Weekly Wrap Up

Here’s your quick summary of TBL blog posts you may have missed and a quick list of quick and interesting articles and blogs out this week, prepared just for you! 


This Bipolar Life: Exploring Boundaries

Actually the weekend was fairly good and then late Saturday afternoon presented us with free tickets for the kids to go to Emerald City Comic Con, something they have always wanted to do and involves a huge amount of fun (and tons people – we’re talking 80,000). So at crack of dawn Sunday morning arrives and as it turned out I wasn’t going to be able to go with them. They would have to attend solo as a little group. My little group. And cue the anxiety!

This Bipolar Life: Fighting Fair

This past weekend there was a prolonged period of anxiety and increased stress, as I mentioned in a previous post. Here’s the thing about me and my bipolar brain, when I spend that much time in an elevated state of anxiety or stress I start to find an outlet for all that negative energy, and it’s not always healthy. It triggers what I call a “stress reflex” and there are a few different ways this typically manifests for me: emotional eating, retail therapy, wine, smoking, or arguing…


Why a World Bipolar Day? (Huffington Post)

World Diabetes Day, World Cancer Day, and even World Egg Day, and now, drum roll please, World Bipolar Day (WBD). WBD is a day to bring about awareness of bipolar disorder. It is the brainchild of Dr. Pichet Udomratn, a member of the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder (ANBD) who collaborated with International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) to bring his idea to fruition. Now, each year, WBD will be celebrated on March 30, the birthday of Vincent Van Gogh, who was posthumously diagnosed as probably having bipolar disorder.

Life With Postpartum Depression and Undiagnosed Bipolar: I Thought I Was a Bad Mom (EmpowerHER)

“And that is exactly what happened, first with the irritability, snap judgment and anger, which left me ashamed and discouraged. You’ve seen mothers like me at the store, snapping at their children for sneaking candy into the cart, their indignation disproportionate to the offense.

Then I started rapid cycling. Like the blades of a windmill, my emotions whipped from the “highs” of agitation, insomnia and rage, to the depths of debilitating inertia and depression, round and round, sometimes several times a day.”

TRUOG: My brother’s struggle (Yale Daily News)

“When I was a senior in high school, my older brother was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I remember the early warning signs: the bizarre emails home, the euphoric self-confidence, the missed classes. Most of all, I remember visiting him in the hospital for the first time. He was wearing a white hospital gown, his pupils were dilated with mania and his whole body shook with crazed energy as he talked, caking his torso in a layer of sweat.”

The Low-Down on Mental Health Support Groups (US News and World Report)

Research suggests peer-run support groups for patients with mental illnesses confer myriad benefits, ranging from physical to emotional to social. Here are a few reasons you might want to seek out a support group if you have depression, bipolar or another disorder:

They’re varied. There’s no one-size-fits-all form of mental illness – and the same can be said for peer support groups, says Steve Harrington, president of the International Association of Peer Supporters, a nonprofit that promotes peer support in mental health systems. This means you’re likely to find a group that’s a good match for you.

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